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Monthly Archives: May 2008

5/28/08 Laura Manuelidis

Laura

Laura Manuelidis

Only the Carver*

At the front of the boat, her breasts bare,
Her long hair locked in ringlets
With the paint of the sea scales
She rides between the phases of the sea and air.
No men see her, busy at the ropes,
Their bodies pulsing like single strands
Against the contracture and loosening of the tides:
Only the carver smiles to his bride.
In the dark attics of the shipyards, keeping course,
Abundant women, with truncated bodies, sprawl across the floor
But on every ship, as a ghost, each is there
Driven forward by rudder and sail
Adrift between the purity and lack of air.
And as to all my relic sisters from the past
The sea renews its lovemaking with its bitter lips
Upon my face, my mouth, my breasts
And down upon my body boat of men<
Whose singing and carousing I must carry through the storm ahead.

* previously published in the CT River Review
and in the poet’s book “OUT OF ORDER.”

Laura Manuelidis, is a physician, a self-professed subversive scientist and unfashioned experimentalist who resides in the medieval village of New Haven. She has some published poems and a chapbook, “OUT OF ORDER”. You can visit her website poetry sampler at:
http://info.med.yale.edu/neurosci/faculty/manuelidis_poetry.html
 
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Posted by on May 28, 2008 in * A Few Poems, * Past Features

 

5/21/08 – Open Mic Theme: POEMS FROM THE POD!

In attics, cellars, closets, (and now the rental POD) we store the discarded, the previously used or useful, the events, memories, past ambitions we’d rather forget, rooms of broken furniture, boxes of abandoned dreams. So, metaphorically speaking — what’s lurking out in the POD, or in your attic, cellar, root cellar, or your bus-station locker? Unfinished novels? Doctor Who’s Tardis? Grandma’s ceramic elf collection? Uncle Ned?? ‘Fess up with poetry or the literary genre of your choice.

You can read your storage locker poems or someone else’s. The storage can be literal or figurative, the discarded can be autobiographical or pure fiction. As always, readers can also read poems on whatever topic they chose. Themes are fun but voluntary..

 
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Posted by on May 21, 2008 in * Past Theme Nights

 

5/14/08 Cortney Davis


Cortney Davis‘ second poetry collection, Leopold’s Maneuvers (University of Nebraska Press, 2004), won the Prairie Schooner 2003 Book Prize. Her first collection, Details of Flesh, was published by CALYX Books in 1997, and a memoir about her work as a nurse practitioner, I Knew a Woman: the Experience of the Female Body, was published by Random House in 2001 and won the Connecticut Center for the Book Non-Fiction Award in 2002. She is co-editor of two award-winning anthologies from University of Iowa Press, “Between the Heartbeats: Poetry and Prose by Nurses” (1995) and “Intensive Care: More Poetry and Prose by Nurses” (2004). She has received an NEA Poetry Fellowship, three CT. Commission on the Arts Poetry Grants, and has been three times nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She is the poetry editor of “Alimentum,” a journal of literature about food. (Mar Walker Photo)

 
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Posted by on May 14, 2008 in * Past Features

 

5/7/08 – Lynn Tudor Deming

Lynn Tudor Deming‘s chapbook “Heady Rubbish” was selected by former US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky for the 2005 Philbrick Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared in numerous publications, including Atlanta Review, Dogwood, Georgia State University Review, and The Ledge. She is the recipient of several awards, including second prize in Atlanta Review’s 2004 International Poetry Competition. Dr. Deming is a clinical psychologist who practiced for many years in Manhattan, and now lives in Connecticut, where she recently finished renovating a 1918 house. She anticipates opening a practice here later this year, and is at work on a full-length poetry manuscript. She began writing seriously in the late 1990’s.

Read a sample of her work in the Fairfield Review

 
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Posted by on May 7, 2008 in * Past Features

 
 
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