RSS

Terence Stewart McLain: 5/24/51–11/24/08

27 Nov
WNPS has lost one of its hosts. We have lost a friend and a unique voice in the world. We didn’t misplace him. He isn’t fired. He went the way of all men, Terry, Terence Stewart McLain, 57, died on Monday Nov. 24, 2008, at home in his Sherman, CT apartment which was overtop a stable.  Terry McLain, we miss you. We will miss your words, your rationality, your always nuanced reactions to the world and to the world of words and ideas.   Your death is a tragedy, and came far too soon. You were so valued in so many ways by so many. There is so much to say, and so much that cannot be said.   The poetry community here will be mourning your loss for a very long time. A private funeral for family was held the week that Terry died at the St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Ridgefield, CT.
A memorial service for Terry McLain was held at the Housatonic Friends Meeting House in New Milford, CT on Sunday, January 18, 2009. It was snowy morning but the memorial was well-attended, and many people were moved to speak of him during the service. Afterwards there was a fellowship gathering complete with a buffet of  home-made food, coffee & tea in the community room downstairs.  People stayed, chatted and remembered Terry and were there for several hours. Thanks to all who brought food items and to the Society of Friends for sharing their loss with us and for their gracious hospitality.
A few ladies of the poets group presented a comfort quilt they are in the process of making for Terry’s girlfriend Pamela. The quilt has various squares representing aspects of Terry’s life, (basketballs for his and his son’s love of the game, dog prints for his old hound dog that he lost last year, owls both for his wisdom and for the fact he was a bit of nightowl on the internet, etc etc. It also features  a photo of him and the hand lettered text of his signature poem “The Window Accepts Its Brick.” His poet friends signed a square of the quilt on the back.

WNPS has lost one of its hosts. We have lost a friend and a unique voice in the world. We didn’t misplace him. He isn’t fired. He went the way of all men, Terry, Terence Stewart McLain, 57, died on Monday Nov. 24, 2008, at home in his Sherman, CT apartment which was overtop a stable.  Terry McLain, we miss you. We will miss your words, your rationality, your always nuanced reactions to the world and to the world of words and ideas.   Your death is a tragedy, and came far too soon. You were so valued in so many ways by so many. There is so much to say, and so much that cannot be said.   The poetry community here will be mourning your loss for a very long time. A private funeral for family was held the week that Terry died at the St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Ridgefield, CT.

A memorial service for Terry McLain was held at the Housatonic Friends Meeting House in New Milford, CT on Sunday, January 18, 2009. It was snowy morning but the memorial was well-attended, and many people were moved to speak of him during the service. Afterwards there was a fellowship gathering complete with a buffet of  home-made food, coffee & tea in the community room downstairs.  People stayed, chatted and remembered Terry and were there for several hours. Thanks to all who brought food items and to the Society of Friends for sharing their loss with us and for their gracious hospitality.

Anne Marie Marra's Quilt for Terry & Pamela

A few ladies of the poets group presented a comfort quilt they are in the process of making for Terry’s girlfriend Pamela. The quilt has various squares representing aspects of Terry’s life, (basketballs for his and his son’s love of the game, dog prints for his old hound dog that he lost last year, owls both for his wisdom and for the fact he was a bit of nightowl on the internet, etc etc. It also features  a photo of him and the hand lettered text of his signature poem “The Window Accepts Its Brick.” His poet friends signed a square of the quilt on the back.

UPDATED LINK: Click for more photos and to read a few of Terry’s poems.

Advertisements
 
18 Comments

Posted by on November 27, 2008 in * Past Specials

 

18 responses to “Terence Stewart McLain: 5/24/51–11/24/08

  1. Anonymous

    December 1, 2008 at 2:28 pm

    A friendly logical supportive presence is gone, a really interesting and surreal poet, a warm human voice in the world…. You are missed already, T.S. McLain!

     
  2. Anonymous

    December 1, 2008 at 2:32 pm

    What –??? He was just there in Nov!! What a SHOCK.I am so sorry to hear this. Thinking of you all Rose Drew

     
  3. Anonymous

    December 1, 2008 at 2:36 pm

    mclain @ halcyon.com wonders if he is related to Terry.

     
  4. Henry

    December 2, 2008 at 1:57 am

    I was Terry’s first “voluntary” roommate in College. After we graduated we painted house for a few months in the Catskills and on Long Island and then moved to NY, first getting a weekly apartment in Harlem and then in Manhattan Beach in Brooklyn. We started our careers in NY with Terry working as an office boy of sorts and me as a typist working at the company where Terry got his first “real” job. When Terry interviewed for the job he thought he blew the interview because all he did was talk about Joyce’s Ulysses. As it turned out it was that conversation that secured him the job. We lost touch but despite having not seen Terry in years, I thought of him often. I was always content in the knowledge that we would one day get back in touch and rekindle old times. Darnit.

     
  5. Bill

    December 3, 2008 at 1:00 am

    I thought I had left a message before but I don’t see it. I don’t even remember what I said. OK, here goes again. I’ve been Terry’s friend since high school. Henry, I remember you by name, but I’m not sure if we ever met. I remember getting a letter from Terry when you 2 were house painters — and there had been a flood. Terry wrote a letter to me that started real, but then morphed into a fantasy about the flood washing you away!And I remember getting long letters from him on his early times in NY. This midwestern boy loved reading them!Terry loved the poetry group. You were lucky to know him and have him with you in person so often. Best wishes to all. Terry’s death is huge to me. I’m very very sad.Why not, I’ll be a stickler for details. Terry’s college major was American Studies, not history. He did a lot with literature and writing in the major. See, it makes more sense.Bill Warren

     
  6. Anonymous

    December 3, 2008 at 1:50 am

    Pamela, I hope you will leave a message here. As his love over the last three years, you should be represented.

     
  7. Bill

    December 3, 2008 at 3:45 am

    I see my post now. And I see that Terry is listed as having an American Studies major here. It’s on the funeral home website that it says he had a history major. Who knew that and corrected it? You knew him pretty well. Whoever you are, good. Thanks. It’s not important. You know how it is when you are under stress. I focused on a little item as a way of coping with Terry’s death. I need to talk about Terry’s death. Anyone who wants to email me for any reason, please do so:wwintheqc@gmail.com.Thanks.Bill Warren

     
  8. mar

    December 3, 2008 at 4:52 am

    Bill, I altered the post after you said it was American Studies. We are all stunned out here. I will be reading the comments from this blog at Wednesday Night Poetry tomorrow and encouraging folks to post stories here. You may well get a few letters. – Mar Walker

     
  9. mar

    December 4, 2008 at 3:25 pm

    I am writing this little entry for people who are not from around here, so they can get an idea of what is happening out here. I just want to let people know, that ON Wed. Nov 26, we read Terry’s poems at Wed. Night Poetry at the open mic. (Some of us belonged to a writer’s group and so had copies of some of his poems.) His love, Pamela came, though she is not a poet, and we all wept together during poetry and after at place called Greenwoods. That Sunday a few of us went to the regular Quaker gathering that Terry and Pamela usually attended. Some folks there were just learning of Terry’s death. It is the kind of Quaker group that sits in silence, then after a while, if someone is moved they speak. Terry was on everyone’s mind on this day. Last night (Dec 3) at Wednesday poetry, many people read poems they had written for Terry or in reaction to his death. To help the community at this time, the featured reading was changed from Plath to Rumi. Hugs to all those who are grieving.

     
  10. Anonymous

    December 5, 2008 at 2:58 am

    Terry, we miss you.

     
  11. Sandra

    December 10, 2008 at 1:37 pm

    I was at the open mic wednesday the 3rd. I read a little something to Terry…. I will always remember him having to lift the microphone higher after soneone else had just read. He seemed very committed to poetry and his group. I wish I got to know him better… Love,-Sandra Mally

     
  12. Anonymous

    December 26, 2008 at 3:08 pm

    Please pray for Terry’s boys. As much as everyone will miss him, the loss to his boys is life altering. They loved him and he loved them. They have lost their father forever.

     
  13. Nancy Pontius

    December 29, 2008 at 3:33 pm

    I did not know. Terry was my online friend. We wrote songs together. I have this group, a collaborative project with a lot of writers, called Project Bluebird. Terry wrote one of my favorite songs. It is very lo-fi but it is a great song. I will try to do a better recording one day. He was an outstanding poet and friend. He was very kind to me. I am so sorry to his family, and loved ones, I know what a great person he was. He touched people all over the place. You can hear his song here:Staying and Leaving by Terry McClainhttp://soundclick.com/share?songid=4451511I had another one to record as well that he had written. I am so sorry for your loss. With love, Nancy Pontius

     
  14. Jackie

    January 20, 2009 at 11:04 pm

    I was an online friend of Terry’s, and I just learned of his death. I had been thinking about him the other day, but took for granted that I could email him at any moment to say hi and see what he was up to.Though I did not know him “in real life,” I knew enough about Terry to know that he was a gifted poet, a funny and intelligent person whom I never got tired of bantering with, and a devoted father. I will miss him.

     
  15. MomGoesInCircles

    January 21, 2009 at 4:44 pm

    Terry was a part of a writers website called Gather (well it was originally ‘billed’ to be a writers site, but that’s another story). He was also a much enjoyed clever voice of reason for many of us there. As I have been away some time, and several of his other friends just came to know…I apologize for the lateness of this note. Terry (we knew him as Rubicon) was forever clever, wise and witty. Solemn and melancholy at times, but aren’t all geniuses from time to time?From personal conversations, I do know how very much he loved his sons as well as Pamela. I see the ‘official’ memorials left her out completely, what a shame. You were loved, by a good man and don’t forget it.On behalf of a small group of “Gatherers” who cared for him, I am sending thoughts, prayers and a dose of gratitude that we were ever graced with his presence. Nicole (the “sunflower” of Gather)

     
  16. Lydia

    January 23, 2009 at 9:43 pm

    Yet another of Terry’s many online friends here. I wish I had had the opportunity to know him as well as you folks in the poetry club, but I am just glad to have known him at all. He was a warm presence, and a thoughtful critiquer who benefited me enormously, not least by his confidence and support. I recently sold my first poem, and the only sadness connected with it is knowing that I won’t be hearing the birdsong of his IM sign-in to be able to tell him. I know how happy he would have been for me.I’m hoping some how he knows.

     
  17. Laura

    December 13, 2009 at 3:16 pm

    I co-wrote a poem with Terry a while back and thought I’d share it here. I met him online as well. He is missed.

    Navigating the Interstices
    *a collaboration*

    I am rocked by the empty in the boat, by everything
    that is not a wave, by the wind from the hills
    that moves like handwork, the rumble
    of a panel truck cresting the hill,
    deer rustling in the forsythia.

    Sometimes, what passes for silence is unacknowledged
    chaos, the occassional ordering of indecision
    a scatter of pebbles in the riverbed.
    Haunch of hill behind me, a presence
    I pause on the mud-belted belly
    of the river bank slope,
    toss twigs into the flow
    until one synchronizes – and tips out of sight.

     

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: